What HR Can Learn from the Grammy’s and Oscars - HighGround



What HR Can Learn from the Grammy’s and Oscars

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It’s awards season, which means that we’ll soon be inundated with red carpet interviews, bad fashion choices and of course, winners’ speeches. And with those things also comes news that a few of the oldest awards shows around – the Grammy’s and Oscars – are making big changes.

The Grammy’s, first held in 1959, recently announced that this year’s winners will receive the iconic gramophone trophy with a GoPro camera inserted at the base. When a winner takes the stage to accept the award, the viewers at home will get a first-person view of what’s it’s like to win.

And this year, Oscar winners won’t be saying the litany of “thank yous” that usually dominate their speeches. Instead, a scrolling list of everyone the winner would like to thank will appear at the bottom of television screens. The goal is to shorten speeches and hopefully, make them a bit more interesting to the audience watching at home.

In short, the Grammy’s and Oscars reevaluated what makes their awards broadcasts engaging. So what does this have to do with HR? Here are three key takeaways that can help organizations change the way they approach engagement:

It’s OK to teach an old dog new tricks.

These awards shows are good examples of how “old school” organizations took a revamped look at their traditions. Companies are now doing the same thing by reexamining how they engage a very important audience – their employees. The Grammys and Oscars are simply re-tweaking something unique about themselves without losing their identities altogether. Organizations can do the same with their own workforces by maintaining the same values that made them successful but simply imparting them to employees in a new, more relevant way. For example, instead of giving employees annual, monetary-based service awards, organizations can shift to real-time, non-monetary recognition.

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach.

Ultimately the Grammys and Oscars are after the same goal: improving engagement among their audiences. But they’re taking two different approaches. To that end, there’s no one-size-fits all to engaging employees. (There’s a reason that simply getting a beer cart hasn’t solved all employee retention issues.) While one solution works for one company, it could be a failure for another. Be open to new ideas that seem “out of the box” – they might be exactly the jolt your company needs to energize your workforce.

Understand what your audience wants.

The Oscars knew its audience grew tired of those long acceptance speeches so they did something about it. So as you rethink your engagement strategy, it’s imperative to know what’s important to your audience. If your leadership team establishes values and goals that are important to them but meaningless to employees, then your engagement strategy is bound to fail. You can get honest, candid feedback through anonymous pulse surveys or poll questions. Responses will help you better understand what’s important to your employees and you can craft a strategy around their needs.

As you watch the awards shows this season, think about new ways to engage your audience. Are you doing anything to revamp the traditional way of doing things at your company? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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